“How the Arts Make Kids Smarter” And “Singers Discover the Healing Power of Music” – August 2007

At the Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York, “the healing power of music was a central theme of the lectures.” These weekly sessions were called “Music For Air”. The lectures were given to medical professionals, music therapists, and musicians by experts on a weekly basis for one hour from March 1- May 14,2007. The lectures used scientifically proven facts to prove the “benefits of music beyond entertainment.” Larry Rawdon can attest to the doctors awareness” that a patient’s frame of mind plays a huge role in recovering after a medical procedure and with remaining positive to cope with an illness”, as he had a lung transplant on Oct .30, 2005 at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. During his six month stay he promoted a concert series . He made the following observation: “for the period of time the audience was listening to the music, it was as though they didn’t have a care in the world. And , judging from the mood of the audience as they departed, I believe they carried that with them for some time.” Larry Rawdon’s article is entitled Music and Medicine Work Together (July/August 2007) and is from the Allegro Magazine of Local 802 Associated Musicians of Greater New York.

We are beginning a new school year which is a new opportunity to use classical music in the classrooms during math and English composition class and after school during homework time. Classical music played in the background helps students learn to relax, allowing them to do a better job on their work. The new school year is also a wonderful opportunity to start learning a musical instrument to learn discipline, cooperation, teamwork, motivation, concentration and self-esteem . Studying a musical instrument develops millions of new connections, synapses, between nerve cells in the brain. Many of the worlds scientists , doctors, and mathematicians are also musicians.

July’s newsletter was a testimonial to the many Valedictorians, Salutatorians and grads of 2007 who are scholars and musicians.

The question of the month:

Mr. P-O asked “whether you believe adults are capable of any reasonable development of their math and memory capabilities in utilizing music? Also, do you think it would help disorganization of the mind ? (I constantly jump from one subject to another and love them all).”

My answer: Listening to Classical music on a regular basis, has the power to organize the brain. I have adult students who have become capable of developing and improving their math and memory capabilities by taking instrumental lessons. As Dr. Arnold Scheibel director of the Brain Research Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles says one can sharpen the mind by studying a musical instrument which requires coordination and concentration; muscular and mental tasks. He says, playing a musical instrument is a high level of activity. “Your brain has a whole new group of muscle control problems to solve. But that’s nothing compared with what the brain has to do before the violinist can begin to read notes on a page and correlate them with his or her fingers to create tones. This is a remarkable high level type of activity.” Reading the notes on the page, placing the fingers on the instrument for correct pitch, and the coordination involved are a high level brain activities. Classical music has the power to organize the brain while listening to it as background music while you are doing work and exercising. Begin listening or playing your musical instrument for 30 minutes.It helps because of its highly developed mathematics and therefore exercises the brain as physical exercise exercises thebody. For more scientific evidence, medical evidence, and musical therapy refer to my book The Secret of Teaching Science & Math Through Music. To order my book, click here

If your student does not enjoy fractions and decimals, start the school year off right by looking at “Musical Notes On Math” , teaching fractions and decimals the fun way through the rhythm of music, the Winner of the Parent To Parent Adding Wisdom Award.

Click here for the “Musical Notes On Math” one page math to rhythm tip sheet. Click here to buy Musical Notes On Math go to :

This August if you have a question about the power of music for education and healing … what would your specific question be? Look on the left side to where it says ask me a question!

“How the Arts Make Kids Smarter” (July 7, 2007) by Mary Belle McCorkle and Shirley Kiser from the Tucson Citizen, Tucson, Arizona.

  • Gene Jones, a retired businessman moved to Tucson in the spring of 2000 and “became president of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra board, attended a national conference for people running symphony orchestras. There, he heard of an experimental program in North Carolina that brought orchestra players into the classrooms not just to expose kids to the pleasures of music, but also to help classroom teachers impart curriculum and teach basic skills.” This North Carolina program was so successful in raising children’s test scores that Jones decided to fly several of the Tucson educators to North Carolina to see the program at work. They were so excited about the North Carolina program that they decided to implement a similar program in Arizona . “Seven years later, Opening Minds through the Arts, the program they excitedly sketched out on their way home, is in 36 TUSD schools, serving 17,000 students for 32 weeks a year. It’s been so successful at pleasing teachers and parents, and raising test scores, that Harvard University has studied it as a model for arts integration.” To read the entire article go to :http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/opinion/56776.php

“Singers Discover the Healing Power of Music” (July 13,2007) by Penny Stretton from the Hampstead and High Archant Regional Limited in the UK.

  • “Singers in Kentish Town … have discovered the health benefits of bursting into song will be holding their fourth annual benefit concert this month. Community choir Sing for Joy, for people with Parkinson’s disease and other chronic conditions, helps people manage their illnesses.” The choir began 4 years ago . Monica Nettles, a member of the choir ,”I have been involved with the choir pretty much since the beginning. I found it as I had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s six months previously and was having to make huge changes in my life. The choir was such a positive thing and therapeutic in more ways than I imagined. Parkinson’s sufferers tend to lose the strength in their voice so the choir is designed to exercise it. But it is also such a great way of self expression and we have built up a sense of mutual support.”

Classroom Update On Using Classical Music in the Public School Classrooms and while doing homework after school:

  • “How the Arts Make Kids Smarter” (July 7, 2007) by Mary Belle McCorkle and Shirley Kiser from the Tucson Citizen, Tucson, Arizona. Gene Jones, a retired businessman moved to Tucson in the spring of 2000 and “became president of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra board, attended a national conference for people running symphony orchestras. There, he heard of an experimental program in North Carolina that brought orchestra players into the classrooms not just to expose kids to the pleasures of music, but also to help classroom teachers impart curriculum and teach basic skills.” This North Carolina program was so successful in raising children’s test scores that Jones decided to fly several of the Tucson educators to North Carolina to see the program at work. They were so excited about the North Carolina program that they decided to implement a similar program in Arizona . “Seven years later, Opening Minds through the Arts, the program they excitedly sketched out on their way home, is in 36 TUSD schools, serving 17,000 students for 32 weeks a year. It’s been so successful at pleasing teachers and parents, and raising test scores, that Harvard University has studied it as a model for arts integration.” To read the entire article go to: http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/opinion/56776.php

Performing at Hospitals, Rehab Hospitals, and Retirement Homes

  • Madeline Frank, violist has shared her music with patients at local Hospitals and Rehab Hospitals in Virginia. If anyone has an experience they would like to share on the benefits of classical music please write me and I will include it in the September 2007 newsletter.

Wishing you and your family a good August from your Non-Invasive Medicine…Music Expert, Madeline

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